Featured Club: Burnside High School

By Conquisitor

Burnside High School has been running a League of Legends Club for the past couple of months, hosting weekly sessions where its students can play League of Legends in intra and interschool matches.

LEARNING SPORTSMANSHIP

“We have improved as a team significantly,” says Michael Green, a student at Burnside. “All players have started giving and taking advice, as our attitude towards each other has improved so much. I now use my mistakes to improve: How can I learn from this? How do I get better? It helps that our teams are reflecting as a group.”

The club—run by Burnside teacher Fin Cresswell—has been using these Sportsmanship Materials and our Teacher’s Resource page to help students assess their own learning. These tools aim to encourage self awareness in a competitive environment, helping students identify and reflect on their own behaviour.

Losing is hard, it does not feel good, so we have to respect the losing experience. Having someone shake your hand makes you deal with losing. Sportsmanship helps you to move forward from the game

“You must respect other players,” says Ash Fitzgibbon, another student involved in the club. ”Before this, I did not think it mattered, now I understand that it’s important because it changes the game for the better. Losing is hard, it does not feel good, so we have to respect the losing experience. Having someone shake your hand makes you deal with losing. Sportsmanship helps you to move forward from the game.”

COMMITMENT FROM STUDENTS

Weekly club meetings involve VOD reviews at lunchtime on Tuesdays, where students review their games as a team to understand their competition, formulate strategy and help each other improve; followed by supervised games of League of Legends after school.

“We have a huge commitment from the students who are in the High School League,” says Cresswell, as three of the club’s six teams currently compete in the New Zealand tournament every Tuesday.

After school sessions see teams playing two instraschool custom games against their peers, before going on to play interschool games as part of the HSL from their school computers.

Yet with the current focus placed on the HSL teams, the experience for new players could use improvement, Cresswell tells us, and is looking at setting up a schedule where new players can play in a less competitive environment; one where they can just have fun and learn.

I’d like to start some inter-connection with the other Christchurch schools

The club is still in its infancy, having only run for nine weeks, and Cresswell has ideas on where he’d like to take it. From teaching students to shoutcast (commentate) to getting pros in to talk to the students, Burnside are looking to expand their club in many ways. “I’d love a big LAN at the end of the year,” Cresswell tells us. “I’d like to start some inter-connection with the other Christchurch schools.”

The students also reflect this mentality, keen to try their skills against their peers from other schools.

“We want an end of year LAN,” says Michael Green. “We want other schools to have clubs so we verse them!”

GET INVOLVED

A League of Legends Club can be started by any teacher at any school. If you’d like to know more about League of Legends high school initiative, head to our Teacher’s Resource page or contact the Oceania High School Team at OCE-Highschool@riotgames.com.


1 month ago

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